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“NOTHING LESS THAN A DELIBERATE ASSAULT LAUNCHED SURREPTITIOUSLY BY PLOTTERS AGAINST LIBERTY”

(CONNECTICUT). Acts and Laws Of His Majesty"s English Colony of Connecticut. New Haven and New London: 1769 [i.e. 1782].

1769 edition of the Connecticut Acts & Laws, with a printing of the 1662 Royal Charter, sessional Acts and Laws from 1752-68, and first edition sessional Acts from 1769-82. With rare early printings of some of the most controversial pre-Revolutionary parliamentary laws, including several quartering acts, a 1757 duty on tea setting the stage for the incendiary 1773 Tea Act, evidence of revolutionary fervor with the striking removal of the words “Our Sovereign Lord George the Third, King of Great-Britain” from all acts printed after 1775 and, following the Continental Congress’s urging that all states sever all ties to Britain, a printing of Connecticut’s own 1776 declaration of independence. $4000.

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“EVERY MAN HAS THE LIBERTY OF DOING ALL THINGS WHICH ARE RIGHT
AND MANY THINGS WHICH ARE WRONG”

(CONNECTICUT). Sixth of August or the Litchfield Festival Address. [Hartford], 1806).

First edition of the anonymous pamphlet containing an impassioned Federalist response (dated September 1st, 1806) to Jeffersonian Republicans, believed written by Connecticut Judge Tapping Reeve, founder of “the first true American law school,” an ardent Federalist later implicated with the pamphlet’s Federalist publisher in a lawsuit ultimately settled in 1812 by the Supreme Court. $3000.

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