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Found 97 books(s). Showing results 1 thru 10.
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"OUR CAUSE IS JUST: OUR UNION IS PERFECT … BEING WITH ONE MIND RESOLVED TO DIE FREEMEN, RATHER THAN TO LIVE SLAVES"

(JEFFERSON, Thomas and DICKINSON, John). Declaration… [on] Taking Up Arms. [Newspaper printing]. Cambridge, Massachusetts, Vol. VII. Numb. 365., July 21 – July 27, 1775.

An extraordinarily rare July 1775 Massachusetts newspaper printing (occupying the entire front page) of one of the greatest state papers of the American Revolution and the most important forerunner to the Declaration of Independence: the July 6, 1775 "Declaration… Setting Forth the Causes and Necessity of Taking Up Arms," written by Thomas Jefferson and John Dickinson for the Second Continental Congress. $28,000.

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“THE CLEAREST OF ALL EXPOSITIONS OF THE BASIC PRINCIPLES OF DEMOCRACY” (PMM)

PAINE, Thomas. Rights of Man. BOUND WITH: Part the Second. London, 1791, 1792.

Extremely rare 1791-1792 editions of Paine’s revolutionary classic, containing the scarce second edition of Rights of Man (Part I), issued within days of the first edition, together in one volume with the rarely found first edition, first issue of Part the Second. Paine's Rights of Man, one of his most important, influential, and best-selling works, is "the clearest of all expositions on the basic principles of democracy" (PMM), and remains "one of the most ardent and clear defenses of human rights, liberty, and equality in any language" (Fruchtman). Paine hoped the work "would do for England what his Common Sense had done for America" (Gimbel), but it resulted in the prosecution of Paine, his publishers and booksellers, and forced Paine to flee to France. $25,000.

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“THE CLEAREST OF ALL EXPOSITIONS OF THE BASIC PRINCIPLES OF DEMOCRACY” (PMM)

PAINE, Thomas. Rights of Man. BOUND WITH: Part the Second. London, 1791, 1792.

Scarce early editions of both parts of Paine's revolutionary classic Rights of Man, each published within days of the extremely rare first editions: the second edition, first issue of Part I, bound together with the third edition of Part II. Paine's Rights of Man, one of his most important, influential, and best-selling works, is "the clearest of all expositions on the basic principles of democracy" (PMM), and remains "one of the most ardent and clear defenses of human rights, liberty, and equality in any language" (Fruchtman). Paine hoped the work "would do for England what his Common Sense had done for America" (Gimbel), but it resulted in the prosecution of Paine, his publishers and booksellers, and forced Paine to flee to France. $25,000.

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“THE BEST CONTEMPORARY ACCOUNT OF THE REVOLUTION FROM THE BRITISH SIDE”

STEDMAN, Charles. History of the Origin, Progress, and Termination of the American War. London, 1794. Two volumes.

First edition, wide-margined copy, of Stedman's massive contemporary two-volume History of the American Revolution—"the standard work on the subject"—containing 15 military maps and plans (11 folding, the largest nearly 20 by 30 inches), beautifully bound in contemporary tree calf. $22,000.

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"AT A TIME WHEN THE INVALUABLE LIBERTIES OF AMERICA SEEM AT STAKE AND THE VERY VITALS OF OUR EXCELLENT CONSTITUTION WOUNDED…"

WAYNE, "Mad" Anthony. Three autograph surveying journals signed. No place, 1769-72.

Most desirable set of three autograph surveying journals, written entirely in the hand of Revolutionary War General "Mad" Anthony Wayne and signed nine times, with 2-1/2 pages of fiery pre-war content on British slights and the importance of liberty. $19,500.

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SIGNED BY JOHN HANCOCK

HANCOCK, John. Document signed. Philadelphia, March 14, 1776.

Exceedingly rare 1776 official congressional military commission appointing 21-year-old John Nice, Gentleman from Pennsylvania, as a captain, signed by Hancock. In 1776 Hancock, as President of the Second Continental Congress, was the first to sign the Declaration of Independence, reportedly penning his name large so King George III could read it without glasses. As Founding Father, Hancock was “a key figure in securing independence and creating the republic.” Twice governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, in 1788 he was named President of the Constitutional Convention debating the U.S. Constitution—urging its ratification in what many historians consider “Hancock’s finest moment.” $16,500.

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FIRST EDITION OF JOHN QUINCY ADAMS’ ORATION ON LAFAYETTE, 1835, PRESENTATION COPY INSCRIBED BY ADAMS

ADAMS, John Quincy. Oration on the Life and Character of Gilbert Motier de Lafayette. Washington, 1835.

First edition of Adams’ stirring Oration honoring Lafayette following his death at the age of 78, delivered by Adams before Congress on December 31, 1834, inscribed on tipped-in leaf (as always), “Thomas K. Davis from John Quincy Adams.” In the original presentation binding boards. $16,500.

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"PURCHASE ALL THE GOOD RIFLES YOU CAN MEET WITH"

WAYNE, Anthony. Autograph letter signed. Philadelphia, February 24, 1776.

Exceptional February 1776 autograph signed letter from "Mad" Anthony Wayne to Captain John Lacey, ordering that Lacey—his longtime adversary—recruit men and round up enlistees in Bucks County; arrange for a commissioned officer to train those men at Darby; and purchase good rifles in preparation for marching toward New York in the build up for the Battle of Trois-Rivières. $15,500.

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GENERAL LAFAYETTE DECLINES TRANSPORT FROM JOHN QUINCY ADAMS—"YOU KNOW THAT I HAVE ASKED THE UNITED STATES PRESIDENT NOT TO DISPATCH THE NATIONAL VESSEL THAT CONGRESS HAD THE KINDNESS TO DECIDE TO DISPATCH"

LAFAYETTE, Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de. Autograph Letter Signed. Paris, June 20, 1824.

A fascinating Lafayette letter, penned entirely by him, in which he discusses his transportation options as he prepares for his Revolutionary War "Heroes Welcome" tour of the United States in 1824. A liberal French aristocrat, Lafayette played a critical role in convincing French leaders to aid Americans in their war for independence, and indeed led troops alongside George Washington, fighting in several crucial battles, including the Battle of Brandywine and the Siege of Yorktown. In his later years, he made a triumphant tour of the United States, where he was given lavish gifts for his services. $15,000.

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