Five Anti-Slavery Pamphlets

SLAVERY

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Item#: 123780 price:$1,900.00

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"IT IS NOT IN THE POWER OF HUMAN LAW TO MAKE MEN ENTIRELY FORGET THAT THE SLAVE IS A MAN": COLLECTION OF FIVE ANTEBELLUM ANTI-SLAVERY PAMPHLETS

(SLAVERY) (AMERICAN & FOREIGN ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETY) (ANTI-SLAVERY EXAMINER). Five Anti-Slavery Pamphlets: Anti-Slavery Examiner No. 5, 1838. BOUND WITH: Anti-Slavery Examiner No. 6, 1838. BOUND WITH: Third Annual Report of the Anti-Slavery Society, 1836. BOUND WITH: Thirteenth Annual Report of the American & Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1853. BOUND WITH: Proceedings of the New York Anti-Slavery Convention, 1835. New York: various publishers, 1835-53. Octavo, contemporary three-quarter calf, black morocco spine label, marbled boards. $1900.

Sammelband of antebellum anti-slavery pamphlets and periodicals, including two issues of the Anti-Slavery Examiner; a first edition of the 1853 annual report of the American & Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, which includes Frederick Douglass' powerful address arguing against the Liberia plan; a first edition of the proceedings of the 1835 New York Anti-Slavery Convention; and a 1836 first edition of the Third Annual Report of the Anti-Slavery Society.

A collection of anti-slavery pamphlets and periodicals, largely from the American Anti-Slavery Society. The AASS (1833-70) was an abolitionist society founded by William Lloyd Garrison and Arthur Tappan. Frederick Douglass was a key leader of this society who often spoke at its meetings. William Wells Brown was also a freed slave who often spoke at meetings. By 1838, the society had 1350 local chapters with around 250,000 members.

The American & Foreign Anti-Slavery Society was a more moderate alternative to the American Anti-Slavery Society, founded in May 1840 by a group of abolitionists who had left the AASS due to a series of doctrinal differences. Founders of the AFASS included Arthur and Lewis Tappan, Amos Phelps, and William Jay, who disagreed with William Lloyd Garrison and others within the AASS who argued that women's rights, opposition to governmental institutions, and other views were fundamental parts of abolitionist doctrines. While AFASS was, by far, the less popular of the two organizations, they managed to secure the serial rights of Uncle Tom's Cabin for the newspaper they had founded, The National Era. It brought them new prominence. By the 1853 meeting—the annual report of which is included here—AFASS was able to secure speakers including Frederick Douglass, who spoke out powerfully and at length against the expatriation of slaves to Liberia [printed in the Appendix of this work]. Early ownership label.

Some foxing; marginal ink stain to upper corner of Anti-Slavery Examiner No. 6, not affecting text. Contemporary binding sound and attractive.

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