Sammy Younge, Jr.

James FORMAN   |   Moses ASCH   |   Frances ASCH

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Item#: 119912 price:$950.00

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"HERE WAS A MAN WHO HAS SERVED HIS COUNTRY, AND WHAT HAD IT GOTTEN HIM?": FIRST EDITION OF SAMMY YOUNGE, JR., 1968, INSCRIBED IN THE YEAR OF PUBLICATION BY CIVIL RIGHTS LEADER JAMES FORMAN

FORMAN, James. Sammy Younge, Jr. The first black college student to die in the Black Liberation Movement. New York: Grove, 1968. Octavo, original black cloth, original dust jacket. $950.

First edition of a powerful account of the murder of Black Navy veteran Sammy Younge, Jr., which marked to Forman "the end of tactical non-violence," inscribed in the year of publication by him to the wife of legendary Folkways Music' founder Moses Asch, "To My Dear Friend Frances Asch, Best Wishes James Forman 12/15/68."

Forman was an Air Force veteran and journalist who became involved with CORE before his association with the Freedom Riders and SNCC. In 1961 he barely survived racist attacks by armed whites before his appointment as executive secretary of SNCC, where he quickly "filled a vacuum …. [and] expanded SNCC's role" (Branch, Parting the Waters, 533). He called the disappearance of Chaney, Goodman and Schwerner "the first interracial lynching in the history of Mississippi," and was leading a meeting in church when he learned that the bodies of the three men had been discovered (Watson, Freedom Summer, 206).

Forman viewed the all-white jury's acquittal of Marvin Segrest for the January 1966 murder of Sammy Younge as a turning point in uniting the civil rights and antiwar movements. Younge, a Navy veteran who had only one kidney, was shot and killed by Segrest when he tried to use a "whites only" restroom. At his funeral, as John Lewis, Stokely Carmichael and Forman "stood looking at the American flag draped over his casket, Lewis recalled, 'The irony hit me hard. Here was a man who has served his country, and what had it gotten him?'" To Forman, Younge's murder "marked the end of tactical non-violence." The April of the following year, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. rose in New York's Riverside Church and boldly called for a "radical revolution." He challenged the values of a nation that sent Black men "crippled by our society" to Vietnam, in order to "guarantee liberties which they had not found in Southwest Georgia and East Harlem." In 1968, on "the one-year anniversary of King's Riverside speech," he was assassinated (Lucks, Selma to Saigon, 113, 195-96, 209). "First printing" stated on copyright page. With double-page map, 15 pages of black-and-white illustrations and full-page facsimile. The recipient of this copy is Frances Asch, the wife of Folkways Music founder Moses Asch, The son of Sholem Asch, Moses Asch assembled a peerless roster of musicians that "spurred the folk-music revival of the 1950s and the protest-song movement of the 60s. Bob Dylan's first album included versions of songs he had learned from the Folkways Anthology of American Folk Music" (New York Times). After Moses Asch's death in 1986, Frances Asch supervised the transition of the Folkways roster and archives to the Smithsonian, which was aided in part by the Grammy Award-winning benefit album, Folkways, A Vision Shared, featuring Dylan, Springsteen, U2, John Mellencamp, Willie Nelson, Emmylou Harris, Doc Watson, Arlo Guthrie and Pete Seeger (Smithsonian). Trace of bookseller notation to corner of initial blank leaf.

A fine copy.

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