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"THE TRUE BIRTH OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT"

(BLACK HISTORY). Photograph, Panoramic. Fort Bragg, North Carolina, circa 1943.

Exceptional panoramic photograph of WWII Black soldiers of the 318th Combat Engineers, who served in the segregated 93rd Infantry Division that fought in the Pacific, returning home as war's end to a surge in racist riots and lynchings. $3400.

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FACTS OF LYNCHINGS "BURN LIKE ACID," TURNING "COLD LEGAL POINTS INTO POINTS OF FLAME"

(HOUSTON, Charles Hamilton) (LLEWELLYN, Karl). Memorandum Brief. New York, 1933.

First NAACP edition of a seminal work chiefly authored by Charles Houston, "one of the key champions of American racial justice," triggered by the 1933 Tuscaloosa lynchings of young Black men, contending the federal government already has the "power necessary to protect people against lynching… based on the 14th Amendment and Reconstruction-era civil rights laws," with Foreword by legal scholar Karl Llewellyn and Postscript by NAACP Executive Secretary Walter White, especially rare in fragile original self-wrappers. $2800.

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TRIGGERING "THE SECOND PHASE OF THE CIVIL WAR… WHAT FORT SUMTER WAS TO THE FIRST. BUT THIS TIME THE REBELS WON"

(BLACK HISTORY) (BOYER, Benjamin Markley). New Orleans Riots. Washington, D.C. 1867.

First edition of the controversial Minority Report on the July 1866 mob violence in New Orleans, proclaimed an "absolute massacre" by General Sheridan as white police joined anti-Unionist rebels in the assault and murder of nearly 40 Black men and women, feared by many Northerners as the spark in "a reign of terror," in fragile original self-wrappers. $1800.

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“PHILADELPHIA’S BLACK HISTORY MIRRORS THE LARGER STUDY OF AFRICAN AMERICANS”

(SOCIETY OF FRIENDS). Statistical Inquiry. Philadelphia, 1849.

First edition of the highly influential second census of Philadelphia’s African Americans, a work cited by W.E.B. Du Bois in his own history, The Philadelphia Negro (1899), and published by the Society of Friends to record the “distress and degradation which prevail… most of which can be distinctly traced to the evil influences of slavery.” $900.

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